Monthly Archives: February 2012

Where to Get Vintage-Inspired Swim Suits

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Have you ever looked through old family photo albums of vacations to the beach and noticed how amazing swim suits used to be? But the thought of wearing an authentic, vintage swim suit may feel kind of icky.

At Rubber Soul Vintage, we love all things vintage, but carrying authentic, vintage swim suits isn’t our thing. Although, we’ll point you in the right direction should you choose to buy a vintage-inspired suit.

At unique-vintage.com, you can find many vintage-inspired swim suits, wedding and prom dresses, shoes, and accessories. Some of the models of these pieces even look like Bettie Page and Marilyn Monroe.

The site also has clothing for men and kids. The mens department has selections of casual dress, tuxedos, and accessories.

We, at Rubber Soul Vintage, do prefer authentic vintage, but we also carry some vintage-inspired pieces too. So if you are around the San Diego area, make sure you stop into the store at 625 8th Avenue.

Unique-vintage photo found here. Bettie Page photo found here.

Unique Vintage Swim Suit

Unique Vintage Swim Suit

Betty Page Posing on the Beach
Betty Page Posing on the Beach

 

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Vintage Inspired Weddings

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"Our Big Fat Vintage Wedding" on Vintage.weddings.com

"Our Big Fat Vintage Wedding" on Vintage.weddings.com

At Rubber Soul Vintage in San Diego, CA, we love all things vintage. Although we don’t have too many wedding dresses in our store, we do love the idea of a vintage inspired wedding.

Vintage.weddings.com by the Knot is an adorable website devoted to weddings that take ideas from the past. People can share their vintage wedding ideas, stories, and of course, photos.

One couple titled their wedding, “Our Big Fat Vintage Wedding,” going all out. The couple looked in the bride’s childhood home’s attic and devoured vintage goods found at Savers, a secondhand shop. They used old mason jars as vases, a bread box for depositing cards, and vintage dessert plates that all had to be washed by hand.

Another couple’s wedding was featured on the site called, “An Outdoor Vintage Wedding in Washington DC.”  The bride wore old jewelry that belonged to her grandmother, in addition to her vintage lace dress.

Perhaps a vintage wedding is so special because it feels nostalgic, classic, and long-lasting, like marriage itself. All we know is that we like it!

“Gatsby’s Got It” Trend at New York Fashion Week 2012

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Rachel Zoe's "Gatsby's Got It" Runway Look

Rachel Zoe's "Gatsby's Got It" Runway Look

Harper’s Bizarre was on the many fashion news companies that reported on New York’s fashion week this year. According to Bizarre, the trends this year were flower power, out of Africa, sport couture, lessons in geometry, sorbet separates, and our favorite, Gatsby’s got it- inspired by Daisy Buchanan of the Great Gatsby.

1920s sequins styles with low cut necklines and mid-calf length dresses was shown by designer Derek Lam. Designer Rachel Zoe’s dresses were long and elegant with puffy, organic sleeves, giving the look an angelic feel. The runway even saw some flapper dresses by Marchesa.

Runway fashion has often looked to the past for influence. And this year, with the “Gatsby’s got it” trend, it couldn’t be more true. Runway fashion is incredibly expensive, but the more frugal fashionista can look to this year’s trends for inspiration. Rubber Soul Vintage Fashion in San Diego, CA which provides affordable vintage fashion, can be one way to achieve it.

Rachel Zoe runway photo found here. Derek Lam runway photo found here. Marchesa runway photo found here.

 

 

 

Derek Lam's "Gatsby's Got It" Runway Look

Derek Lam's "Gatsby's Got It" Runway Look

Marchesa's "Gatsby's Got It" Runway Look

Marchesa's "Gatsby's Got It" Runway Look

 

 

Floral Sensationalism in the 1970s

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Ossie Clark Checks Fit of His Design on a Model

Ossie Clark Checks Fit of His Design on a Model

The late 1960s were a rebellious time for youth in America and they wanted to claim a look for themselves. They didn’t want to be associated with their elders, so they didn’t dress like them. The 1970s gave way to a “back to nature” fashion movement. Musicians and designers traveled to countries that they believed were closer to nature and wore the ethnic prints and embraced the lifestyle.

During the “back to nature” trend, the clothes were floral rich, organic in design, flow-y, fringe-y, and asymmetrical. No patterns were too wild or bizarre. Colors were warm and bright and there were plenty of them.

Designer Zandra Rhode’s 1970s dresses and shawls were groundbreaking to the 1970s fashion movement. The designs were colorful, asymmetrical, and had interesting patterns like shells, leaves, and butterflies.

Ossie Clark was another influential 1970s designer. He came to fame with his swinging sixties apparel, but changed with the times. His dresses are known for gently fitted shapes, layering, maxi coats, and deep v-necks.

At Rubber Soul Vintage, we have many 1970s dresses and suits. Stop in for yourself and see!

Ossie Clark Dress

Ossie Clark Dress

 Ossie Clark dress photo found here. Ossie with model photo found here.

 

A Vintage Lover’s Valentine’s Day

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Vintage lipstick red blouse sold by QZVintage on Etsy.com.

Vintage lipstick red blouse sold by QZVintage on Etsy.com.

Valentine’s Day has a mysterious history. Some historians say that we started celebrating a day for Saint Valentine (or Valentinus) after she died in A.D. 270. But the holiday nevertheless disappeared for awhile, for unknown reasons.

What we do know, is that Valentine’s Day has been celebrated on February 14th for the last few centuries. So, why not commemorate this year with vintage Valentine’s Day commodities?

If you can’t stop in to Rubber Soul Vintage in San Diego, CA, there are some other alternatives to support small businesses. Like Etsy: the online hub for vintage and handmade goods and services. A simple search for “Valentine’s Day” on the site can inspire you to celebrate today with vintage style.

You can find vintage cards, pink teapots, feminine aprons, heart-trimmed shoes, lipstick-colored clothing, and much more. The downside? You can’t try things on and inspect for yourself and many items cannot be returned. But perhaps if the price is right, it may be worth the risk.

Blouse photo (above) found here. Apron photo (below) found here.

Vintage Valentine's Day apron sold by Hannah Taylor on Etsy.com.

Vintage Valentine's Day apron sold by Hannah Taylor on Etsy.com.

Androgyny Fashion: Then & Now

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Marlene Dietrich as Amy Jolly in Morocco

Marlene Dietrich in Morocco.

Coco Chanel's Androgynous Designer Clothing

Coco Chanel's Androgynous Designs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emmanuelle Alt for Vogue Editorial Spread

Emmanuelle Alt for Vogue Editorial Spread.

 

 

 

Androgyny as a fashion or style refers to the delicate interlacing of feminine and masculine characteristics seen in clothing and hairstyles. This style was popular in a few 1930s films, most notably Morocco where Marlene Dietrich plays Amy Jolly. Dietrich’s character dresses in feminine and masculine clothing throughout the film which made tuxedos carry an entirely different message.

In 1993, a movie about the mid-nineteenth century’s wild west called The Ballad of Little Joe, Suzy Amis‘ character, Josephine Monaghan, disguises her gender by dressing as a man. She goes by “Jo” and wears oversized masculine clothing in order to survive on her own during a time when being alone was dangerous for a woman. Click here to see a photo.

Fashion continues to use this trend, and the media is still fascinated by it. Published just today, an Associated Press article, “Gender-bending model pushes limits of the runway” tells the story of Andrej Pejic, a model who will walk New York’s Fashion Week  runway as both a man and woman.

Even before Hollywood picked up this trend, Coco Chanel introduced an androgynous look in the 1910s. Now, new fashion leaders like Emmanuelle Alt are continuing the androgynous designs.

Dietrich photo found here. Chanel photo found here. Alt photo found here.

Post-War American Style

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Hattie Carnegie Suit, 1952

Hattie Carnegie Suit, 1952

The 1950s was a time of great change for fashion in America. Before the war, most wealthy fashionistas used to import their expensive clothing from Paris. They would follow whatever style was “in” without any regard for practicality.

But times were changing. Industries became aware of the average women who, too, wanted to buy clothing- but at a more affordable price. So designers like Norman Norell, Claire McCardell, and Mainbocher utilized the recent technological advances in the manufacturing process, setting up shop in the United States. These factories pumped out clothing that copied current trends but made them with an emphasis on wearability for on-to-go Americans.

Hattie Carnegie was one of first pioneers of the American style, specializing in ready-to-wear clothing and for creating an entire look. Her more affordable clothing was very popular during the 1950s post-war times.

And still, these styles remain timeless and worn. First Lady, Michelle Obama wore a vintage Norman Norell dress at a Christmas party in December 2010. Now, you can find similar dresses at Rubber Soul Vintage in San Diego, CA.

Photo attribution of Hattie Carnegie suit found here, Michelle Obama photo found here.

Michelle Obama Wearing Vintage Norman Norell Dress (Dec. 2010)

Michelle Obama Wearing Vintage Norman Norell Dress (Dec. 2010)